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  • Connect a 9 Volt Battery to your Arduino using the supplied 9 Volt Battery Snap.

  • Depending on what you are asking the arduino to do the 9v battery can last 10+ hours!

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Insert the TMP36 Temperature Sensor into the breadboard so that the flat face of the sensor is facing away from the Arduino.
  • Insert the TMP36 Temperature Sensor into the breadboard so that the flat face of the sensor is facing away from the Arduino.

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Connect the 5V line from the Arduino to the 5V pin of the TMP36.
  • Connect the 5V line from the Arduino to the 5V pin of the TMP36.

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Connect Analogue Pin 0 to the TMP36's Voltage Out Pin (this is the middle pin).
  • Connect Analogue Pin 0 to the TMP36's Voltage Out Pin (this is the middle pin).

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Connect the TMP36's ground pin to ground on the Arduino.
  • Connect the TMP36's ground pin to ground on the Arduino.

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Insert your push button.
  • Insert your push button.

  • Be sure to really push down on the push button so that the bottom of the push button is flush with the breadboard (this will feel like you're pushing too hard).

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Connect the push button to one of the Arduino Ground Pins.
  • Connect the push button to one of the Arduino Ground Pins.

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Connect the Push Button to Digital Pin 12.
  • Connect the Push Button to Digital Pin 12.

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  • Upload the code to your Arduino.

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  • Put your Arduino in the Fridge.

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Read the saved values on your computer by opening the Serial Monitor in the Arduino IDE and pressing the push button.
  • Read the saved values on your computer by opening the Serial Monitor in the Arduino IDE and pressing the push button.

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Finish Line

8 other people completed this guide.

Madeleine Schappi

Member since: 09/27/2017

4,527 Reputation

24 Guides authored

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6 Comments

I had to remove the spaces around the “EEPROM.h” text in the #include statement in order to get the code to compile: #include <EEPROM.h> . MacOS High Sierra, with Arduino IDE v1.8.5

Anthony Joseph - Reply

Thanks for the heads up Anthony! I had run the code through a “beautifier” before uploading, and it must have added the spaces. I’ve just updated the code. Thanks again!

Marcus Schappi - Reply

Glad to be useful Marcus - so far having a great time with the advent calendar! Please keep up the amazing work :D

Anthony Joseph -

IF there are still people listening, Madeleine, components on the board are heating up. Odd

john Zuill - Reply

If it head up, you’re putting it in backwards!

Cheers,

Marcus

Marcus Schappi -

Ok, Ive figured out what I did wrong and fixed it. I just have some questions. The script seems to work with the battery is plugged in. Im not sure why I put it in the fridge ( to get a different reading I guess. ) the script does not seem to work at all if the battery is connected with out the connection to the computer. Sorry. Im a bit confused.

john Zuill - Reply

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